Soloing

Reading Exercises for Jazz Guitar

Reading Exercise #28 A Guest Post by Michael Berard

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Jazz Improvisation on Bossa Novas and Brazilian Standards

Bossa Novas and Brazilian tunes sound oh-so-good. Tunes written by Jobim are almost ubiquitous, with classics like "Girl from Ipanema" and "Desafinado" being favorites for jazzers and non-jazzers alike.  If you've ever tried to play one though,...

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Use Double-Stops Melodically

What's a double stop? On guitar, the term "double stops" means two notes played simultaneously. Another way to think of them is as intervals: thirds, fourths, sixths, and so on. Guitarists including Johnny Smith, Jim Hall and others used double...

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How to Solo on II-V-I

The Most Common Progression in Jazz Hello again! I'm so glad you could join us again. If you're reading this, it might be because you are interested in learning how to solo on II-V-I progressions. Seeing as how this is, in fact, the most common...

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How to Play What You Hear for Jazz Guitarists

In this short video and blog lesson, we'll discuss three ways to play what you hear as jazz guitarists. Three Ways to Play what you hear Play What You Hear Tip #1: Reduce the Constraints! Play What You Hear Tip #2: Play What You Sing! (And...

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Creating Melodic Lines from Scales and Arpeggios

How not to sound like a textbook when you're soloing You can get started creating your own melodic lines with simple scales and arpeggios immediately. It is so often understood in jazz improvisation that we are to play the "right" notes over...

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