Question by Michael
(Oklahoma City, OK)

What would you suggest as a good daily practicing routine?

Or, if you were looking at a typical week, how might you suggest one break down practicing different facets of their playing over the course of the week, and for how long each day?

I’m often curious to know what kind of practice routine guitarists I admire follow, although I realize some great guitarists don’t really have a ‘routine’ or practice regimen they follow.

M-A’s Answer:

Hello Michael,

This is a good question and it’s at the heart of getting better, Jazz guitar wise. Obviously (and as usual) there’s no straight answer.

First things first, you should check out “The art of improving … your improvement!”, an article published a while ago. The basic idea is that you break down your practice according to what needs to be practiced. It’s a very personal thing!

For instance, you may be a strong strong comper, but you lack the ability to build a good solo. Then, the assessment of what should be practiced will reflect the situation. On the other hand, the player that is weak at comping and good at soloing will organize his (her) practice differently. You know?! 🙂

There’s also this video, in which I discussed a more “radical” step-by-step approach.

I hope this helps!

Marc-Andre Seguin
“Improve Your Jazz Guitar Playing with a REAL Teacher”

Old Comments for Practicing

Feb 11, 2014
I give in!
by: David

Hi Marc,

I give in. Who started this?!!!!



Feb 10, 2014
Both approaches are right!
by: M-A (Website)

Both approaches (at the same time, if you can) are right!

And I’m sure there’s also an option c) … Anyways.

I always suggest: less talking about it and more practicing about it. Ehehe.


Marc-Andre Seguin
“Improve Your Jazz Guitar Playing with a *REAL* Teacher”

Feb 10, 2014
Practicing priorities
by: David


Thanks for that and will look again. You will be pleased to hear that my first reading of your article id in fact prompt me to go out and buy an ‘el cheapo’ digital timer ( good intentions) and review the items sitting on the floor! However, how about these two schools of thought………….

a. ‘Let the song ( presumably the one that is currently occupying the bilk of practice time ) dictate all current theory/technique/reading’ and….

b. ‘If you need a scale, arpeggio etc;, for the song then learn that scale or arpeggio and not fifty others’

Not necessarily where I am coming from in either case but both angles have been pushed by the two teachers I had.

Look forward to your response.



Feb 09, 2014
Answer to David
by: M-A (Webmaster)

Good question David … I really think my answer lies in the newsletter sent on February 7 2014. If you’re a subscriber, you can access all the back-issues.

If not, send me a private email and I’ll send you the link! Thank. 🙂

Marc-Andre Seguin
“Improve Your Jazz Guitar Playing with a *REAL* Teacher”

Feb 07, 2014
Practicing – priorities
by: David N-A AKA ‘Blackcat’


Just read your response to Michael (?) in Oaklahoma. Clearly superb advice and the proof of the pudding is in your very own accomplishment.

However,whilst having piles of work to delve into – mostly actual piles of paper on the floor marked variously ‘Arps’,Diminished’, ‘Guide Tones’,Scales’,Walking Bass’ and much, much more not to mention umpteen stored videos to watch on the PC, at the moment I find that my involvement with an all-age atelier/workshop that meets here in France every two weeks with an end of year concert in June takes all of my time and whilst we are only on song number 4 of a hit list of ten, comping and improvising for those numbers actually leaves little time for other topics. Needless to say, the comping brings along issues of voice leading and right hand technique and the soloing brings just about everything into view but when it comes down to it the songs pretty well occupy the whole of say 3 hours each day.

Would love to know how you see this. Do you set time aside for new songs or change your priorities when you have a gig or new CD coming up?



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